Left paranasal hemophilic pseudotumor in a 5-year-old boy: A case report

  • Saleh Yuguda | yugudas@gmail.com Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Gombe State University/Federal Teaching Hospital Gombe, Gombe State, Nigeria.
  • Ahmed Iya Girei Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Gombe State University/Federal Teaching Hospital Gombe, Gombe State, Nigeria.
  • Rufai Abdu Dachi Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Teaching Hospital/Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Bauchi, Bauchi State, Nigeria.
  • Sani Adamu Department of Surgery, Pediatric Surgery Unit, Gombe State University/Federal Teaching Hospital Gombe, Gombe State, Nigeria.

Abstract

Hemophilic pseudotumors are rare complications of hemophilia that are seen in 1-2% of patients commonly affecting patients with severe disease. Hemophilic pseudotumors occur as a result of recurrent poorly managed or untreated bleeding either in the soft tissue or bone. We report a 5-year-old boy with a previously undiagnosed hemophilia A who developed left paranasal swelling following a fall from a height. He was diagnosed with hemophilic pseudotumor and successfully managed conservatively with factor VIII replacement.

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Published
2020-01-15
Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
Hemophilia, pseudotumor, paranasal
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How to Cite
Yuguda, Saleh, Ahmed Girei, Rufai Dachi, and Sani Adamu. 2020. “Left Paranasal Hemophilic Pseudotumor in a 5-Year-Old Boy: A Case Report”. Annals of African Medical Research 2 (2). https://doi.org/10.4081/aamr.2019.79.